Midnight’s Children — Salman Rushdie

I just finished reading Rushdie for a class and I enjoyed it very much. Worth the read for those of you who haven’t read it!

BookerManPries


Sorry for the delay in publishing posts lately: I have spent the last month or so either away in India or catching up on my massive backlog of work for having been away in India. However, to make up this I shall aim to publish more frequently than once a week for the next couple of weeks and shall turn my attention towards some Indian novels, beginning with the most successful book when it comes to the Booker.

Not only has Midnight?s Children won the Booker Prize, it has also won two other supplementary prizes: ?Booker of Bookers? (in 1993) and ?The Best of the Booker? (in 2008) to commemorate 25 and 40 years of the Booker Prize respectively. I must admit, I started reading this book with some degree of hesitation: any book so highly lauded has a good chance of being underwhelming relative to the praise it has…

View original post 286 more words

Or So The Story Goes

Interesting. The creation myth told by an atheist.

The Sound and The Fury

From Nick Spencer’s Atheists, The Origin of the Species

“Once upon a time there was a terrible monster that lived in the sky. No one had ever seen it because it lived a long way away, and because it was invisible, but everyone knew it was there because a long time ago it had shown itself to some very clever men.

“These very clever men explained how the monster had one head, three bodies and 1000 eyes, with which it could see into people’s souls. They told terrible tales of what the monster would do if it got angry but also of how kind it was if people would only worship it without thought or question. They explained how the monster had given them a powerful magic, which, if used rightly, would protect the world from evil.

“Sometimes the monster would get angry and when it did the clever men…

View original post 332 more words

Book Review: My Own Mr Darcy, by Karey White

I’ll admit, I crushed on Macfadyen hard core as Mr. Darcy. I still do. Haha but I’ll have to read this one over Christmas break.

Paris Baker's Book Nook

my own mr darcy

After being dragged to the 2005 movie Pride and Prejudice by her mother, sixteen-year-old Elizabeth’s life changes when Matthew Macfadyen’s Mr. Darcy appears on the screen. Lizzie falls hard and makes a promise to herself that she will settle for nothing less than her own Mr. Darcy.

This ill-advised pledge threatens to ruin any chance of finding true love. During the six intervening years, she has refused to give any interested suitors a chance. They weren’t Mr. Darcy enough. Coerced by her roommate, Elizabeth agrees to give the next interested guy ten dates before she dumps him. That guy is Chad, a kind and thoughtful science teacher and swim coach.

While she’s dating Chad, her dream comes true in the form of a wealthy bookstore owner named Matt Dawson, who looks and acts like her Mr. Darcy. Of course she has to follow her dream. But as Elizabeth simultaneously dates…

View original post 483 more words

Michael Moorcock: How to Write a Novel in 3 Days

I don’t know. If I wrote a novel in just 3 days, I’d feel like I rushed through it. Haha

Interesting Literature

Ever fancied writing a novel, but don’t have oodles of spare time to set aside for such a thing? Michael Moorcock, a hugely influential and prolific writer, has the solution. Those of you who like the idea of #NaNoWriMo (or National Novel-Writing Month), but would rather set aside a few days to write rather than a whole month, may like ‘the Moorcock method’.

For over fifty years now, Moorcock has been a significant writer in a number of genres, notably fantasy, science fiction, and horror, although he’s also written more ‘literary’ works, such as Mother London (1988). Here at Interesting Literature we’re avid fans of his work. Moorcock is famous, in writing circles, for being able to write a book in three days. He wrote many of his early fantasy novels at such high speed. (It goes without saying that he wouldn’t have time to do much else in those three…

View original post 815 more words